A field philosopher's guide to fracking : how one Texas town stood up to big oil and gas
(Book)

Book Cover
Average Rating
Published
New York, N.Y. : Liveright Publishing Corporation, [2015].
Format
Book
Edition
First edition.
Physical Desc
x, 336 pages, 8 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations, maps ; 25 cm.
Status
2 copies. Additional copies on order.
La Farge
363.119622 Bri
Southside
363.119622 Bri
Description
Loading Description...
Also in this Series
Copies
Location
Call Number
Status
La Farge
363.119622 Bri
*CHECK SHELF*
Santa Fe Public Library On Order
ON ORDER
On Order
Santa Fe Public Library On Order
ON ORDER
On Order
Santa Fe Public Library On Order
ON ORDER
On Order
Southside
363.119622 Bri
*CHECK SHELF*
More Like This
More Details
Language
English
ISBN
9781631490071, 1631490079

Notes

Bibliography
Includes bibliographical references (pages 289-323) and index.
Description
When philosophy professor Adam Briggle moved to Denton, Texas, he had never heard of fracking. Only five years later he would successfully lead a citizens' initiative to ban hydraulic fracturing in Denton -- the first Texas town to challenge the oil and gas industry. On his journey to learn about fracking and its effects, he leaped from the ivory tower into the fray. Briggle brings us to town hall debates and neighborhood meetings where citizens wrestle with issues few fully understand. Is fracking safe? How does it affect the local economy? Why are bakeries prohibited in neighborhoods while gas wells are permitted next to playgrounds? In his quest for answers Briggle meets people like Cathy McMullen. Her neighbors' cows asphyxiated after drinking fracking fluids, and her orchard was razed to make way for a pipeline. Cathy did not consent to drilling, but those who profited lived far out of harm's way. Briggle's first instinct was to think about fracking -- deeply. Drawing on philosophers from Socrates to Kant, but also on conversations with engineers, legislators, and industry representatives, he develops a simple theory to evaluate fracking: we should give those at risk to harm a stake in the decisions we make, and we should monitor for and correct any problems that arise. Finding this regulatory process short-circuited, with government and industry alike turning a blind eye to symptoms like earthquakes and nosebleeds, Briggle decides to take action. Though our field philosopher is initially out of his element -- joining fierce activists like "Texas Sharon," once called the "worst enemy" of the oil and gas industry -- his story culminates in an underdog victory for Denton, now nationally recognized as a beacon for citizens' rights at the epicenter of the fracking revolution.
Reviews from GoodReads
Loading GoodReads Reviews.
Citations
APA Citation (style guide)

Briggle, A. (2015). A field philosopher's guide to fracking: how one Texas town stood up to big oil and gas. First edition. New York, N.Y.: Liveright Publishing Corporation.

Chicago / Turabian - Author Date Citation (style guide)

Briggle, Adam. 2015. A Field Philosopher's Guide to Fracking: How One Texas Town Stood Up to Big Oil and Gas. New York, N.Y.: Liveright Publishing Corporation.

Chicago / Turabian - Humanities Citation (style guide)

Briggle, Adam, A Field Philosopher's Guide to Fracking: How One Texas Town Stood Up to Big Oil and Gas. New York, N.Y.: Liveright Publishing Corporation, 2015.

MLA Citation (style guide)

Briggle, Adam. A Field Philosopher's Guide to Fracking: How One Texas Town Stood Up to Big Oil and Gas. First edition. New York, N.Y.: Liveright Publishing Corporation, 2015. Print.

Note! Citation formats are based on standards as of July 2010. Citations contain only title, author, edition, publisher, and year published. Citations should be used as a guideline and should be double checked for accuracy.
Staff View
Loading Staff View.