Everybody lies : big data, new data, and what the Internet can tell us about who we really are
(Book)

Book Cover
Average Rating
Contributors
Pinker, Steven, 1954- writer of foreword.
Published
New York, N.Y. : Dey St., an imprint of William Morrow, [2017].
Format
Book
Edition
First edition.
Physical Desc
xi, 338 pages : illustrations (some color), maps ; 22 cm.
Status
Oliver La Farge - Adult  1 available
302.231 Ste
Southside - Adult  1 available
302.231 Ste

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LocationCall NumberStatus
Oliver La Farge - Adult302.231 SteOn Shelf
Southside - Adult302.231 SteOn Shelf

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Language
English
ISBN
9780062390851, 0062390856

Notes

Bibliography
Includes bibliographical references (pages 289-318) and index.
Description
A former Google data scientist presents an insider's look at what the vast, instantly available amounts of information from the Internet can reveal about human civilization and society.
Description
"How much sex are people really having? How many Americans are actually racist? Is America experiencing a hidden back-alley abortion crisis? Can you game the stock market? Does violent entertainment increase the rate of violent crime? Do parents treat sons differently from daughters? How many people actually read the books they buy? In this groundbreaking work, Seth Stephens-Davidowitz, a Harvard-trained economist, former Google data scientist, and New York Times writer, argues that much of what we thought about people has been dead wrong. The reason? People lie, to friends, lovers, doctors, surveys -- and themselves. However, we no longer need to rely on what people tell us. New data from the internet -- the traces of information that billions of people leave on Google, social media, dating, and even pornography sites -- finally reveals the truth. By analyzing this digital goldmine, we can now learn what people really think, what they really want, and what they really do. Sometimes the new data will make you laugh out loud. Sometimes the new data will shock you. Sometimes the new data will deeply disturb you. But, always, this new data will make you think. [This] book will change the way you view the world. There is almost no limit to what can be learned about human nature from Big Data -- provided, that is, you ask the right questions."--J.

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Citations

APA Citation, 7th Edition (style guide)

Stephens-Davidowitz, S., & Pinker, S. (2017). Everybody lies: big data, new data, and what the Internet can tell us about who we really are (First edition.). Dey St., an imprint of William Morrow.

Chicago / Turabian - Author Date Citation, 17th Edition (style guide)

Stephens-Davidowitz, Seth and Steven Pinker. 2017. Everybody Lies: Big Data, New Data, and What the Internet Can Tell Us About Who We Really Are. New York, N.Y.: Dey St., an imprint of William Morrow.

Chicago / Turabian - Humanities (Notes and Bibliography) Citation, 17th Edition (style guide)

Stephens-Davidowitz, Seth and Steven Pinker. Everybody Lies: Big Data, New Data, and What the Internet Can Tell Us About Who We Really Are New York, N.Y.: Dey St., an imprint of William Morrow, 2017.

MLA Citation, 9th Edition (style guide)

Stephens-Davidowitz, Seth,, and Steven Pinker. Everybody Lies: Big Data, New Data, and What the Internet Can Tell Us About Who We Really Are First edition., Dey St., an imprint of William Morrow, 2017.

Note! Citations contain only title, author, edition, publisher, and year published. Citations should be used as a guideline and should be double checked for accuracy. Citation formats are based on standards as of August 2021.

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